How to Absorb Nutrients More Effectively

Posted by Justin T on 4/24/2018 to Health
How to Absorb Nutrients More Effectively

Most of us do our best when it comes to eating healthy, but most do not realize that eating healthy is only as effective as your body’s ability to absorb nutrients. When your body intakes food it breaks down and absorbs each nutrient, having balanced DNA and RNA levels helps to ensure that your body is effectively absorbing all the nutrients it needs. On average, the body only absorbs a small portion of nutrients that it intakes, meaning that a lot of the foods we eat for a healthy lifestyle can sometimes be improperly absorbed.

The Effects of Thyroid Hormone Imbalance

Posted by Christianna Cannon on 4/20/2018 to Nutritional
The Effects of Thyroid Hormone Imbalance
The thyroid is the largest gland in the endocrine system, the system responsible for generating the hormones that regulate all your body’s functions. Most people have heard of the thyroid at least in passing, and assume it has something to do with the body’s regulation of weight and metabolism. That’s true, but the thyroid is more complex than that. This butterfly-shaped gland produces hormones that affect your body’s energy usage, which translates not only into metabolism, but also into mood, energy levels, and even your immune system.

A thyroid imbalance occurs when your thyroid releases either too little or too much of the hormones it produces for the body — Triiodothyronine (T3), Thyroxine (T4), and Calcitonin. An underactive thyroid results in hypothyroidism, while the term for an overactive thyroid is hyperthyroidism. As you can imagine, these imbalances each cause problems on the opposite end of a scale: too little energy or too much; an overly-fast metabolism or a very slow one, and so on. Here’s a breakdown of the issues caused by thyroid imbalance and how to help your body address them.

Is Your DNA and RNA Imbalanced?

Posted by Justin T on 4/16/2018 to Hormones
Is Your DNA and RNA Imbalanced?
RNA (ribonucleic acid) and DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) are chemical compounds that are made by the human body. Each of the nucleic acids are fundamental for several important functions of our bodies, but to simplify how each works, think of DNA as the instructions or guidelines for specific tasks that our body completes, and RNA as the component that helps to carry out and complete those instructions or guidelines. DNA is self-replicating, which means it can reproduce itself, and RNA is created from DNA as needed. Each compound is vital in how your body looks, acts, grows, develops and more. Studies show that as people age, their bodies can begin to lose levels of DNA and RNA.

The Key Roles of DNA and RNA and What They Mean

Posted by Christianna Cannon on 4/6/2018 to Anti-aging
The Key Roles of DNA and RNA and What They Mean

Most people are familiar with the idea of DNA as a “blueprint” to an organism and its unique traits. Our DNA defines an endless list of things: it makes us human, it contains information about our hair color, eye color, skin tone, allergies, and more. But while DNA does contain all the information about our physical structure, it’s much more than simply a blueprint — DNA, along with RNA, are nucleic acids that serve many important functions in the body besides our genetic background.

DNA contains information used by our bodies’ cells in the construction of new proteins, which are needed for cellular growth and reproduction. RNA serves to carry this information to the cells, enabling them to reproduce and repair themselves.

Since DNA and RNA are so important to protein construction and transport, they’re at the root of our bodies’ capability to function. The proper structure and function of our cells relies on DNA and RNA, and without healthy cells, our bodily systems will suffer across the board.

Unfortunately, as we age, our body produces fewer of the hormones required for generating nucleic acids, leading to an imbalance in our DNA and RNA. This imbalance can have several effects. Learn more now!